Chroma Presents: Continuity @ Knockdown Center

 April 14th - April 15th, 2018

 Flyer by Rin Kim

Flyer by Rin Kim

 Photo by Mekdela Maskal

Photo by Mekdela Maskal

Continuity was the second iteration of a conference series curated by Chroma.   By inviting a cadre of makers, thinkers, artists, scholars, and innovators, the participants explored self-preservation for women of color as a narrative for liberation. This was done through a series of moving image installations, lectures, and panels over the course of a weekend.

Continuity debuted at the Knockdown Center over a two-day weekend and was co-organized with love by June Canedo and Sienna Fekete. .


NYLON x MuslimGirl.Com

March 27th, 2018

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On March 27th 2018, I was invited to join a conversation in the NYLON studio with MUSLIMGIRL.COM for a panel discussing the intersection of Islam and feminism, and what it’s like to be a Muslim woman today. You can watch the conversation here. 


Black Portraitures: The Color of Silence @ Harvard University

 March 22- March 24th, 2018

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As a part of the Black Portraitures Conference, held at Harvard University, I presented my research and paper "The Absence of Presence: On the Erasure of Black Muslims".  I am always looking to share and expand on this work! Feel free to contact me about lecture opportunities at your university and or conference(s).

Abstract below:

"From violence perpetrated by Islamophobia to rigorous legislation like the immigration travel ban, to religious holidays – the presence of the Black Muslim narrative has been virtually absent, despite occupying the axes of two of the most marginalized groups in society. This paper will seek to re-center the Black Muslim narrative using case studies of Black Muslim communities’ experiences across the nation and also demonstrate the historical parallels of how Black Muslims have been central to Black resistance and liberation movements from the days of slavery, to the civil rights movements to more contemporary movements like #BlackOutEid and #BeingBlackandMuslim. The image of the Black Muslim body is also considered an anomaly, despite the fact that Black Muslim Americans make up a quarter of the American Muslim population and are a part of communities affected by anti-blackness worldwide. By presenting images of Black Muslim culture, both in the states and globally, the inevitable influence of Black Muslim aesthetic will be highlighted and a gesture towards visibility will be made. The objective is to demonstrate the integral role of Black Muslims in American culture as well as Islamic culture and will in turn reimagine what the future will look like for Black Muslims in a contemporary world. This paper will be accompanied by a multi-media presentation that will include photos and video as a counter to the invisibility of the Black Muslim image in turn expose the multifaceted-ness of the Black Muslim experience across generations."


Chroma NY presents: The Working Woman of Color Conference

 Dec. 9-10th, 2017

 Photo by Mary Kang

Photo by Mary Kang

The Working Womxn of Color Conference, the first iteration of a conference series curated by Chroma debuted in December 2017, where we partnered with 8 Ball Community and Red Bull Music Academy. Organized with love alongside June Canedo and Sienna Fekete, The WWOC  was a live podcast event employing self-actualization as an organizing principle to think, construct and shape powerful narratives of mobility for women of color. Over 30 women from different backgrounds were invited to engage in conversations over a two-day period. The conference and corresponding Podcast is produced by Chroma, who aims to create an accessible blueprint in response to the socio and economic mobility of women of color.


What Will Be Different: Conversations on a Changing America, Weeksville Heritage Center

November 15th, 2017

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In November 2017, I was invited to moderate a discussion as part of  "What Will Be Different: Conversations on a Changing America", a traveling discussion series that explores how diverse communities and issues are affected by an era of sweeping political change.  I had the honor of being in conversation with prominent Sudanese Americans in the New York community about how they had been navigating the sociopolitical climate after the travel ban was announced earlier in the year. The conversation was held at the historical Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, New York.  Stay tuned for the audio!